Young Choristers 650 1700

Susan Boynton, Eric Rice, Eric N. Rice. YOUNG ~ Ti CHORISTERS 650-170011 mr «» V W Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Music 7 Young ChoRiSteRS, 6501700. Front Cover.

Young Choristers  650 1700

First full-length consideration of the role played by young singers, bringing out its full significance and its development over time.

The Children s Troupes and the Transformation of English Theater 1509 1608

Richard Rastall, “Choirboys in Early English Religious Drama,” in Young Choristers, 6501700, ed. Susan Boynton and Eric Rice (Woodbridge: The Boydell P, 2008), 68–85, here, citing p. 68. Nungezer, A Dictionary of Actors, 303.

The Children s Troupes and the Transformation of English Theater 1509 1608

The Children’s Troupes and the Transformation of English Theater 1509–1608 uncovers the role of the children’s companies in transforming perceptions of authorship and publishing, performance, playing spaces, patronage, actor training, and gender politics in the sixteenth century. Jeanne McCarthy challenges entrenched narratives about popular playing in an era of revolutionary changes, revealing the importance of the children’s company tradition’s connection with many early plays, as well as to the spread of literacy, classicism, and literate ideals of drama, plot, textual fidelity, characterization, and acting in a still largely oral popular culture. By addressing developments from the hyper-literate school tradition, and integrating discussion of the children’s troupes into the critical conversation around popular playing practices, McCarthy offers a nuanced account of the play-centered, literary performance tradition that came to define professional theater in this period. Highlighting the significant role of the children’s company tradition in sixteenth-century performance culture, this volume offers a bold new narrative of the emergence of the London theater.

Elementary and Grammar Education in Late Medieval France

... research on the world of the chorister is of some worth to any examination of medieval education. ... Young Choristers, 6501700, edited by Susan Boynton and Eric Rice.22 The need for young boys to be trained in the liturgy provided ...

Elementary and Grammar Education in Late Medieval France

The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries saw a marked increase in the availability of elementary and grammar education in Europe. In France, that rise took the form of a unique blend of trends also seen elsewhere in Europe, ranging from Church-dominated schools to independent schools and communal groups of teachers. Lyon, long a crossroad of ideas from north and south, was home to a particularly interesting blend of approaches, and in this book Sarah Lynch offers a close analysis of the educational landscape of the city, showing how schools and teachers were organised and how they interacted with each other and with ecclesiastical and municipal authorities.

The Corrupter of Boys

In Young Choristers, 6501700, ed. Susan Boynton and Eric Rice, 123–145. Woodbridge, 2008. Podles, Leon J. Sacrilege: Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Church. Baltimore, 2008. Polizzotto, Lorenzo. “When Saints Fall Out: Women and the ...

The Corrupter of Boys

In the fourth century, clerics began to distinguish themselves from members of the laity by virtue of their augmented claims to holiness. Because clerical celibacy was key to this distinction, religious authorities of all stripes—patristic authors, popes, theologians, canonists, monastic founders, and commentators—became progressively sensitive to sexual scandals that involved the clergy and developed sophisticated tactics for concealing or dispelling embarrassing lapses. According to Dyan Elliott, the fear of scandal dictated certain lines of action and inaction, the consequences of which are painfully apparent today. In The Corrupter of Boys, she demonstrates how, in conjunction with the requirement of clerical celibacy, scandal-averse policies at every conceivable level of the ecclesiastical hierarchy have enabled the widespread sexual abuse of boys and male adolescents within the Church. Elliott examines more than a millennium's worth of doctrine and practice to uncover the origins of a culture of secrecy and concealment of sin. She charts the continuities and changes, from late antiquity into the high Middle Ages, in the use of boys as sexual objects before focusing on four specific milieus in which boys and adolescents would have been especially at risk in the high and later Middle Ages: the monastery, the choir, the schools, and the episcopal court. The Corrupter of Boys is a work of stunning breadth and discomforting resonance, as Elliott concludes that the same clerical prerogatives and privileges that were formulated in late antiquity and the medieval era—and the same strategies to cover up the abuses they enable—remain very much in place.

The Cambridge History of Sixteenth Century Music

anthropological Study (1550–1670)ʼ, in Young Choristers (6501700), ed. Susan Boynton and Eric Rice, Woodbridge, 2008, 146–62 Fenlon, Iain, Giaches de Wert: Letters and Documents, Paris, 1999 Fenlon, Iain Music and Patronage in ...

The Cambridge History of Sixteenth Century Music

Part of the seminal Cambridge History of Music series, this volume departs from standard histories of early modern Western music in two important ways. First, it considers music as something primarily experienced by people in their daily lives, whether as musicians or listeners, and as something that happened in particular locations, and different intellectual and ideological contexts, rather than as a story of genres, individual counties, and composers and their works. Second, by constraining discussion within the limits of a 100-year timespan, the music culture of the sixteenth century is freed from its conventional (and tenuous) absorption within the abstraction of 'the Renaissance', and is understood in terms of recent developments in the broader narrative of this turbulent period of European history. Both an original take on a well-known period in early music and a key work of reference for scholars, this volume makes an important contribution to the history of music.

Kids Those Days Children in Medieval Culture

... ed., Young Choristers: 6501700 (Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2008). 5 E. K. Chambers, The Mediaeval Stage, 2 vol. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1903), here 1:336–371 and 2:282–289; and Karl Young, The Drama of the Medieval Church, 2 vol.

Kids Those Days  Children in Medieval Culture

Kids Those Days is a collection of interdisciplinary research into medieval childhood. Contributors investigate abandonment and abuse, fosterage and guardianship, criminal behavior and child-rearing, child bishops and sainthood, disabilities and miracles, and a wide variety of other subjects related to medieval children.

St Paul s Cathedral Precinct in Early Modern Literature and Culture

in Young Choristers: 6501700, eds. Susan Boynton and Eric Rice (Woodridge, Suffolk: The Boydell Press, 2008), 174. * Apart from uniform melody for congregational singing of biblical texts', music had been banned in Geneva, ...

St Paul s Cathedral Precinct in Early Modern Literature and Culture

Prior to the 1666 fire of London, St Paul's Cathedral was an important central site for religious, commercial, and social life in London. The literature of the period - both fictional and historical - reveals a great interest in the space, and show it to be complex and contested, with multiple functions and uses beyond its status as a church. St Paul's Cathedral Precinct in Early Modern Literature and Culture: Spatial Practices animates the cathedral space by focusing on the every day functions of the building, deepening and sometimes complicating previous works on St Paul's. St Paul's Cathedral Precinct in Early Modern Literature and Culture is a study of London's cathedral, its immediate surroundings, and its everyday users in early modern literary and historical documents and images, with special emphasis on the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. It discusses representations of several of the seemingly discrete spaces of the precinct to reveal how these spaces overlap with and inform one another spatially, and argues that specific locations should be seen as mutually constitutive and in a dynamic and ever-evolving state. The varied uses of the precinct, including the embodied spatial practices of early modern Londoners and visitors, are examined, including the walkers in the nave, sermon-goers, those who shopped for books, the residents of the precinct, the choristers, and those who were devoted to church repairs and renovations.

The Care of Nuns

“The Musical Education of Young Girls in Medieval English Nunneries.” In Young Choristers, 6501700, edited by Susan Boynton and Eric Rice, 49–67. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press, 2008. Yardley, Anne Bagnall.

The Care of Nuns

In her ground-breaking new study, Katie Bugyis offers a new history of communities of Benedictine nuns in England from 900 to 1225. By applying innovative paleographical, codicological, and textual analyses to their surviving liturgical books, Bugyis recovers a treasure trove of unexamined evidence for understanding these women's lives and the liturgical and pastoral ministries they performed. She examines the duties and responsibilities of their chief monastic officers--abbesses, prioresses, cantors, and sacristans--highlighting three of the ministries vital to their practice-liturgically reading the gospel, hearing confessions, and offering intercessory prayers for others. Where previous scholarship has argued that the various reforms of the central Middle Ages effectively relegated nuns to complete dependency on the sacramental ministrations of priests, Bugyis shows that, in fact, these women continued to exercise primary control over their spiritual care. Essential to this argument is the discovery that the production of the liturgical books used in these communities was carried out by female scribes, copyists, correctors, and creators of texts, attesting to the agency and creativity that nuns exercised in the care they extended to themselves and those who sought their hospitality, counsel, instruction, healing, forgiveness, and intercession.

A Sociable Moment

963rv (27 January 1700/01). 53. ... the seventeenth century, see Reardon, Holy Concord within Sacred Walls, 38–42; and Reardon, “Cantando tutte insieme: Training Girl Singers in Early Modern Convents,” in Young Choristers 6501700, ed.

A Sociable Moment

After their military defeat by the Florentines in the mid-sixteenth century, the citizens of Siena turned from politics to celebratory, social occasions to express their civic identity and show their capacity for collective action. In the first major work of its kind, Colleen Reardon opens a window on the ways in which the Sienese absorbed the new genre of opera into their own festive apparatus and challenges the prevailing view that operatic productions in the city were merely an extension of Medici power to the provinces. It was, rather, members of the expatriate Chigi family who exploited the festive impulse of their countrymen, coordinating operatic performances with their triumphant visits home by activating ties of friendship and family as well as connections to Sienese institutions, most notably the Assicurate, possibly the first all-female academy in Italy. If the Chigi proved successful at inserting opera into larger patterns of sociability that conveyed the very essence of what it meant to be Sienese (senesità), their successor, the flamboyant playwright and librettist Girolamo Gigli, struggled in his attempts to transform operatic performances into professional enterprises. Fluidly written and richly embellished with anecdotes from historical chronicles, A Sociable Moment offers insight into the Sienese experience with opera during the genre's rapid expansion throughout the Italian peninsula during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

Unwritten Poetry

in Young Choristers, 6501700. Ed. Susan Boynton and Eric Rice (Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2008), 173–94. Folkerth, Wes. The Sound of Shakespeare (London: Routledge, 2002). Foucault, Michel. The Archaeology of Knowledge and Discourse on ...

Unwritten Poetry

Vocal music was at the heart of English Renaissance poetry and drama. Virtuosic actor-singers redefined the theatrical culture of William Shakespeare and his peers. Composers including William Byrd and Henry Lawes shaped the transmission of Renaissance lyric verse. Poets from Philip Sidney to John Milton were fascinated by the disorienting influx of musical performance into their works. Musical performance was a driving force behind the period's theatrical and poetic movements, yet its importance to literary history has long been ignored or effaced. This book reveals the impact of vocalists and composers upon the poetic culture of early modern England by studying the media through which—and by whom—its songs were made. In a literary field that was never confined to writing, media were not limited to material texts. Scott Trudell argues that the media of Renaissance poetry can be conceived as any node of transmission from singer's larynx to actor's body. Through his study of song, Trudell outlines a new approach to Renaissance poetry and drama that is grounded not simply in performance history or book history but in a more synthetic media history.

The Clerical Proletariat and the Resurgence of Medieval English Poetry

Susan Boynton, “Monasteries and Cathedrals,” in Young Choristers, 6501700, ed. Boynton and Eric Rice (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell and Brewer, 2008), 44; see also Joan Greatrex, “The Almonry Schools of Norwich Cathedral Priory,” in The ...

The Clerical Proletariat and the Resurgence of Medieval English Poetry

The first study of the poetics of vocational crisis in Langland, Hoccleve, and Audelay, and many unattributed works, The Clerical Proletariat and the Resurgence of Medieval English Poetry discusses class, meritocracy, the gig economy, precarity, and the breaking of intellectual elites, speaking to both past and present employment urgencies.

A Companion to Late Medieval and Early Modern Siena

Young Choristers, 6501700, Woodbridge, 2008, pp. 195–215. Reardon, C., “Siena Cathedral and its Castrati”, in K.K. Forney and J.L. Smith (eds.), Sleuthing the Muse: Essays in Honor of William F. Prizer, Hillsdale, NY, 2012, pp. 201–17.

A Companion to Late Medieval and Early Modern Siena

A Companion to Late Medieval and Early Modern Siena introduces the once-powerful commune to a wider audience. Edited by Santa Casciani and Heather Richardson Hayton, this collection explores how Siena built a distinctive civic identity and institutions that endured for centuries.

Reforming Music

Young Choristers 6501700 (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2008), pp. 216–240. O'REGAN 2009 Noel O'Regan, “Church Reform and Devotional Music in Sixteenth-Century Rome: The Influence of Lay Confraternities”, in Abigail Brundin and ...

Reforming Music

Five hundred years ago a monk nailed his theses to a church gate in Wittenberg. The sound of Luther’s mythical hammer, however, was by no means the only aural manifestation of the religious Reformations. This book describes the birth of Lutheran Chorales and Calvinist Psalmody; of how music was practised by Catholic nuns, Lutheran schoolchildren, battling Huguenots, missionaries and martyrs, cardinals at Trent and heretics in hiding, at a time when Palestrina, Lasso and Tallis were composing their masterpieces, and forbidden songs were concealed, smuggled and sung in taverns and princely courts alike. Music expressed faith in the Evangelicals’ emerging worships and in the Catholics’ ancient rites; through it new beliefs were spread and heresy countered; analysed by humanist theorists, it comforted and consoled miners, housewives and persecuted preachers; it was both the symbol of new, conflicting identities and the only surviving trace of a lost unity of faith. The music of the Reformations, thus, was music reformed, music reforming and the reform of music: this book shows what the Reformations sounded like, and how music became one of the protagonists in the religious conflicts of the sixteenth century.

Listening to Early Modern Catholicism

Young Choristers, 6501700 (Woodbridge: 2008); Nelson K. (ed.), Attending to Early Modern Women: Conflict and Concord (Newark: 2012); and Monson C.A. – Montemorra Marvin R. (eds.), Music in Print and beyond: Hildegard von Bingen to The ...

Listening to Early Modern Catholicism


Saint Cecilia in the Renaissance

... then went to the cathedral to sing Matins (Sandrine Dumont, “Choirboys and Vicaires at the Maîtrise of Cambrai: A SocioAnthropological Study [1550–1670],” Young Choristers, 6501700, ed. Susan Boynton and Eric N. Rice [Woodbridge, ...

Saint Cecilia in the Renaissance

This study uncovers how Saint Cecilia came to be closely associated with music and musicians. Until the fifteenth century, Saint Cecilia was not connected with music. She was perceived as one of many virgin martyrs, with no obvious musical skills or interests. During the next two centuries, however, she inspired many musical works written in her honor and a vast number of paintings that depicted her singing or playing an instrument. In this book, John A. Rice argues that Cecilia’s association with music came about in several stages, involving Christian liturgy, visual arts, and music. It was fostered by interactions between artists, musicians, and their patrons and the transfer of visual and musical traditions from northern Europe to Italy. Saint Cecilia in the Renaissance explores the cult of the saint in Medieval times and through the sixteenth century when musicians’ guilds in the Low Countries and France first chose Cecilia as their patron. The book then turns to music and the explosion of polyphonic vocal works written in Cecilia’s honor by some of the most celebrated composers in Europe. Finally, the book examines the wealth of visual representations of Cecilia especially during the Italian Renaissance, among which Raphael’s 1515 painting, The Ecstasy of Saint Cecilia, is but the most famous example. Thoroughly researched and beautifully illustrated in color, Saint Cecilia in the Renaissance is the definitive portrait of Saint Cecilia as a figure of musical and artistic inspiration.

Music in Elizabethan Court Politics

... 'From Mozos de coro towards Seises: Boys in the Musical Life of Seville Cathedral in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries', in Young Choristers 6501700, ed. Susan Boynton and Eric Rice (Woodbridge, 2008), pp. 86–103 Rygg, Kristin, ...

Music in Elizabethan Court Politics

Music and musical entertainments are here shown to be used for different ends, by both monarch and courtiers.

Child Composers and Their Works

See Susan Boynton and Eric Rice, eds., Young Choristers, 6501700 (Wood— bridge, U.K.: Boydell Press, 2008). 18. John Rosselli, “Child Performers,” and Hugo Cole, “Children's Opera,” in The New Grove Dictionary of Opera, ed.

Child Composers and Their Works

In Child Composers and Their Works: A Historical Survey, Barry Cooper examines over 100 composers born before 1900 who wrote substantial musical works before age 16. The book provides a general overview of the subject, examining the ways and identifying possible reasons these works have been marginalized in the general literature. The book also contains an annotated checklist of over 100 notable child composers, presenting a valuable and handy reference of these creators and their early works. The annotated checklist presents a chronological listing of child composers born before 1900 and features a descriptive list of what they wrote, often including analytical commentary and offering occasional music examples for illustration. The list also includes a select catalog of works, suggestions for further reading, and recordings when available. Complete with a bibliography and an index of composers, this resource is invaluable to scholars and historians.

Form and Function in the Late Medieval Bible

458–68; on the formative period of medi- eval Christian education, see Susan Boynton, “Boy singers in medieval monasteries and cathedrals” in Young Choristers, 6501700, ed. eadem and Eric Rice, Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Music ...

Form and Function in the Late Medieval Bible

Drawing on expertise in art history, liturgy, exegesis, preaching and manuscript studies, this volume is the first cohesive study of the layout, evolution and use of the Late Medieval Bible, one of the bestsellers of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries.

Ruling the Spirit

“The Musical Education of Young Girls in Medieval English Nunneries.” In Young Choristers: 6501700, ed. Susan Boynton and Eric Rice, 49–67. Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer, 2008. Zarri, Gabriella. “Ecclesiastial Institutions and Religious ...

Ruling the Spirit

In Ruling the Spirit, Claire Taylor Jones revises the narrative of women's involvement in the German Dominican order arguing that Dominican women did not lose their piety and literacy in the fifteenth century, as is commonly believed but, instead, were encouraged to reframe their practice around the observance of the Divine Office.

Thomas Churchyard

... anthony, The Aspiring Mind of the Elizabethan Younger Generation (Durham, Nc: Duke university Press, 1966). evans, James, ... in S. Boynton and e. rice (eds), Young Choristers: 6501700 (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2008), 173–94.

Thomas Churchyard

Soldier, courtier, author, entertainer, and amateur spy, Thomas Churchyard (c.1529-1604) saw action in most of the principal Tudor theatres of war, was a servant to five monarchs, and had a literary career spanning over half a century during which time he produced over fifty different works in a variety of forms and genres. Churchyard's struggles to subsist as an author and soldier provides an unrivalled opportunity to examine the self-promotional strategies employed by an individual who attempts to make a living from both writing and fighting, and who experiments throughout his life with ways in which the arts of the pen and sword may be reconciled and aligned. Drawing on extensive archival and literary sources, Matthew Woodcock reconstructs the extraordinary life of a figure well-known yet long neglected in early modern literary studies. In the first ever book-length biography of Churchyard, Woodcock reveals the author to be a resourceful and innovative writer whose long literary career plays an important part in the history of professional authorship in sixteenth-century England. This book also situates Churchyard alongside contemporary soldier-authors such as Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, George Gascoigne, and Sir Philip Sidney, and it makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the relationship between literature and the military in the early modern period. Churchyard's writings drew heavily upon his own experiences at court and in the wars and the author never tired of drawing attention to the struggles he endured throughout his life. Consequently, this study addresses the wider methodological question of how we should construct the biography of an individual who was consistently preoccupied with telling his own story.