Zen in the Art of Archery

Zen in the Art of Archery

2020 Reprint of the 1953 Edition. Exact facsimile of the original edition and not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Up to the time of publication, "this was the only book written by a westerner, and indeed the only book in a western language that describes the difficult path of learning Zen. A simple, vivid account of personal experience, it may well serve to mitigate the "unspeakable queerness" of Zen to the average westerner--to make the kicks and shouts of the Zen patriarchs seem less like the behavior of lunatics. Students of Japanese culture, too, will find that it sheds much light on the way in which art and religion have been traditionally blended." New Statesman Herrigel's book may have inspired Tim Gallwey's 1974 book The Inner Game of Tennis. Both Herrigel and Gallwey approach sport and life as opportunities for learning inner cooperation. Zen in the Art of Archery also relates to the "inner child" idea in humanistic psychology. This work most likely inspired the titles of many other works, either directly or indirectly. Foremost among these is Robert Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. J. D. Salinger's fictional character Seymour Glass applied one aspect of Zen archery--aiming by deliberately not taking aim--to playing the children's game of marbles. The wider theme of many of these works is that a regular routine can have a spiritual dimension.

Zen Bow, Zen Arrow

The Life and Teachings of Awa Kenzo, the Archery Master from Zen in the Art of A rchery

Zen Bow, Zen Arrow

Here are the inspirational life and teachings of Awa Kenzo (1880–1939), the Zen and kyudo (archery) master who gained worldwide renown after the publication of Eugen Herrigel's cult classic Zen in the Art of Archery in 1953. Kenzo lived and taught at a pivotal time in Japan's history, when martial arts were practiced primarily for self-cultivation, and his wise and penetrating instructions for practice (and life)—including aphorisms, poetry, instructional lists, and calligraphy—are infused with the spirit of Zen. Kenzo uses the metaphor of the bow and arrow to challenge the practitioner to look deeply into his or her own true nature.

Kyudo

The Essence and Practice of Japanese Archery

Kyudo

This guide to the spiritual and technical practice of this graceful martial art, by 15th-generation master Hideharu Onuma, includes illustrations and rare photographs. Kyudo-the Way of the Bow-is the oldest of Japan's traditional martial arts and the one most closely associated with bushido, the Way of the Warrior. After the Second World War Eugen Herrigel introduced the concept of kyudo to the West in his classic Zen in the Art of Japanese Archery. But until now, no Japanese kyudo master has published a book on his art in English. In Kyudo: The Essence and Practice of Japanese

Shots in the Dark

Japan, Zen, and the West

Shots in the Dark

In the years after World War II, Westerners and Japanese alike elevated Zen to the quintessence of spirituality in Japan. In this book, the author argues that much of this elevated position is based on misconceptions and that in fact Zen is not based in Buddhism but in Chinese myth.

Zen in the Art of Rhetoric

An Inquiry into Coherence

Zen in the Art of Rhetoric

Explores relationships between classical and contemporary approaches to rhetoric and their connection to the underlying assumptions at work in Zen Buddhism.

Martial Arts in the Modern World

Martial Arts in the Modern World

Though generally perceived and advertised as means of self-defense, body sculpting, and self-discipline, martial arts are actually social tools that respond to altered physical, social, and psychological environments. This book examines how practitioners have responded to stimuli such as feminism, globalism, imperialism, militarism, nationalism, slavery, and the commercialization of sport.