Zeppelins

William F. Althoff, USS Los Angeles: The Navy's Venerable Airship and Aviation Technology , 2003, ISBN 1-57488-620-7 • Peter Brooks, Zeppelin: Rigid Airships 1893–1940 , 2004, ISBN 085177-845-3 • Manfred Griehl and Joachim Dressel, ...

Zeppelins


Zeppelins

Count Ferdinand Adolph Heinrich von Zeppelin (1838–1917) hailed from Württemberg, the state in whose army he served during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71. He retired in 1890 following disagreement over Prussian domination, and, ...

Zeppelins

On 2 July 1900 the people of Friedrichshafen, Germany, witnessed a momentous occasion the first flight of LZ 1, Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin's first airship. Although deemed a failure, a succession of better craft (LZ2 to 10) enabled the Zeppelin to expand into the consumer market of airship travel, whilst also providing military craft for the German Army and Navy. The years of the Great War saw the Zeppelins undertake strategic bombing missions against Great Britain. This title covers the post-war fate of the Zeppelins, including the crash of the Hindenburg, and their use by the Luftwaffe at the beginning of World War II.

Flaming Zeppelins

He was referring to a light from the zeppelin. As planned, all other lights on the craft had been turned off, but the foredeck beam blinked once through the night and the rain, went black. A moment later, three rope ladders coated with ...

Flaming Zeppelins

What do the disembodied head of Buffalo Bill Cody, Annie Oakley, Frankenstein, the Tin Man, Captain Nemo, the Flying Dutchman, and the inestimable Ned the Seal have in common? Find out as they embark upon a spectacular set of nonstop steampunk adventures. For the first time, two epic chronicles, Zeppelins West and Flaming London, inscribed by a courageous young seal on his trusty notepad, are collected together in one volume. Leap from a flaming zeppelin with the stars of the Wild West Show in a desperate escape from an imperial Japanese enclave. Wash up upon the island of Doctor Moreau, in mortal danger from his unnatural experiments (and ignorant that Dracula approaches by sea). Unite with Jules Verne, Passpartout, and Mark Twain on a desperate voyage to the burning streets of London, which are infested with killer squid from outer space courtesy of H. G. Wells’s time machine. It’s a raucous steam-powered locomotive of shoot-’em-up Westerns, dime novels, comic books, and pulp fiction, as only Lansdale, the high-priest of Texan weirdness, could tell.

The Defeat of the Zeppelins

Strasser accompanied the last bombing raid of the war in his latest, most developed Zeppelin, L.70. It was shot down by a D.H.4 two-seater, an aeroplane that outperformed the Zeppelin in every way. The weather conditions did not help ...

The Defeat of the Zeppelins

Mick Powis describes the novel threat posed to the British war effort by the raids of German airships, or Zeppelins, and the struggle to develop effective defenses against them. Despite their size and relatively slow speed, the Zeppelins were hard to locate and destroy at first. They could fly higher than existing fighters and the early raids benefited from a lack of coordination between British services. The development of radio, better aircraft, incendiary ammunition, and, above all, a more coordinated defensive policy, gradually allowed the British to inflict heavy losses on the Zeppelins. The innovative use of seaplanes and planes launched from aircraft carriers allowed the Zeppelins to be intercepted before they reached Britain and to strike back with raids on the Zeppelin sheds. July 1918 saw the RAF and Royal Navy cooperate to destroy two Zeppelins in their base at Tondern (the first attack by aircraft launched from a carrier deck). The last Zeppelin raid on England came in August 1918 and resulted in the destruction of Zeppelin L70 and the death of Peter Strasser, Commander of the Imperial German Navys Zeppelin force.

Let the Zeppelins Come

Zeppelins had fired the imagination of the German people since the maiden flight of LZ1 on 2 July 1900; they were a source of pride, fascination and wonder. Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin became the figurehead of a culture that embraced ...

Let the Zeppelins Come

A unique insight into the Zeppelin raids through postcards and memorabilia

Jellied Eels and Zeppelins

Zeppelins,. Dolls. and. 'Spanish. Flu'. The Great War of 191418 was the first in which civilians were threatened with the fear of air raids. Ethel was just six when she saw the hydrogenfilledairship,theZeppelin: 'I can ...

Jellied Eels and Zeppelins

As every year goes by... ... the number of people able to give a first hand account of day-to-day life in the early part of the last century naturally diminishes. The small but telling detail disappears. Ethel May Elvin was born in 1906; she recalls her father’s account of standing sentry at Queen Victoria’s funeral, the privations and small pleasures of a working-class Edwardian childhood, growing up through the First World War and surviving the Second. Anyone intrigued by the small events of history and how the majority actually lived day-to-day, will find this a unique and fascinating book.

Zeppelins

This title covers the post-war fate of the Zeppelins, including the crash of the Hindenburg, and their use by the Luftwaffe at the beginning of World War II.

Zeppelins

On 2 July 1900 the people of Friedrichshafen, Germany, witnessed a momentous occasion - the first flight of LZ 1, Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin's first airship. Although deemed a failure, a succession of better craft (LZ2 to 10) enabled the Zeppelin to expand into the consumer market of airship travel, whilst also providing military craft for the German Army and Navy. The years of the Great War saw the Zeppelins undertake strategic bombing missions against Great Britain. This title covers the post-war fate of the Zeppelins, including the crash of the Hindenburg, and their use by the Luftwaffe at the beginning of World War II.

The Defeat of the Zeppelins

Mick Powis describes the novel threat posed to the British war effort by the raids of German airships, or Zeppelins, and the struggle to develop effective defenses against them.

The Defeat of the Zeppelins

Mick Powis describes the novel threat posed to the British war effort by the raids of German airships, or Zeppelins, and the struggle to develop effective defenses against them. Despite their size and relatively slow speed, the Zeppelins were hard to locate and destroy at first. They could fly higher than existing fighters and the early raids benefited from a lack of coordination between British services. The development of radio, better aircraft, incendiary ammunition, and, above all, a more coordinated defensive policy, gradually allowed the British to inflict heavy losses on the Zeppelins. The innovative use of seaplanes and planes launched from aircraft carriers allowed the Zeppelins to be intercepted before they reached Britain and to strike back with raids on the Zeppelin sheds. July 1918 saw the RAF and Royal Navy cooperate to destroy two Zeppelins in their base at Tondern (the first attack by aircraft launched from a carrier deck). The last Zeppelin raid on England came in August 1918 and resulted in the destruction of Zeppelin L70 and the death of Peter Strasser, Commander of the Imperial German Navy's Zeppelin force.

World War I

Weather, accidents, air raids on zeppe- lin sheds, and improved defenses made zeppelin service even more hazardous than U-boat duty ... A 5 January 1918 accidental fire at the Ahlhorn airship base gutted four hangars and five zeppelins.

World War I

Alphabetically arranged entries, supplemented with maps and primary documents, provide a complete history of the First World War.

Zeppelins and Super Zeppelins

M First rigid airship , 32 Zeppelin , 33 Fleet , strength of Zeppelin , 72 , 73 ---- , Zeppelin , 40 Flotation of airships , 15 Fog , effect on Zeppelins , 82 France , raids upon , 9 Friedrichshaven , 37 , 38 Future raids , 148 Machine ...

Zeppelins and Super Zeppelins

Page xiv (blank on the first edition), printed as a footnote to the Introduction on the second edition. "Since the first edition went to press two more Zeppelin raids were made on England..."

Zeppelins of World War I

Zeppelin L - 18 , 56–57 Zeppelin L - 19 , 46–48 , 57 Zeppelin L - 20 , 58 Zeppelin L - 23 , 136-137 , 174 Zeppelin L - 30 , 58-60 Zeppelin L - 31 , 60 , 97 , 105-108 Zeppelin L - 32 , 70 , 94 , 97 , 100-101 Zeppelin L - 33 , 49 , 97 ...

Zeppelins of World War I


Zeppelins Over Lancashire

a as a 111 ihto sisted and second zeppelin flew in 1905. His fourth zeppelin made the breakthrough , with a twelve hour flight in August 1908 , and its potential bomb carrier began to excite speculation in the British press , despite ...

Zeppelins Over Lancashire


When Zeppelins Flew in Pictures

How a Zeppelin Flies 11 Stabilizer Mooring ring Rudder Rudder WT00 . Mod Elevator Stabilizer Ballast Engine car Ballast Gondola Bumper bag All Zeppelins , from the first experimental models to later airliners like the Graf Zeppelin ...

When Zeppelins Flew  in Pictures

A history of Zeppelins in peace and war, from the first seventeen-minute flight in 1900 to the Hindenburg disaster in 1937.

Fascism through History Culture Ideology and Daily Life 2 volumes

The Hindenburg Disaster The Hindenburg was the newest and most luxurious of the great zeppelins flown by the German company Deutsche Zeppelin Reederei (DZR). The great airship launched in 1936 and provided luxury travel over the ...

Fascism through History  Culture  Ideology  and Daily Life  2 volumes

While fascism perhaps reached its peak in the regimes of Hitler and Mussolini, it continues to permeate governments today. This reference explores the history of fascism and how it has shaped daily life up to the present day. Perhaps the most notable example of Fascism was Hitler's Nazi Germany. Fascists aimed to control the media and other social institutions, and Fascist views and agendas informed a wide range of daily life and popular culture. But while Fascism flourished around the world in the decades before and after World War II, it continues to shape politics and government today. This reference explores the history of Fascism around the world and across time, with special attention to how Fascism has been more than a political philosophy but has instead played a significant role in the lives of everyday people. Volume one begins with a introduction that surveys the history of Fascism around the world and follows with a timeline citing key events related to Fascism. Roughly 180 alphabetically arranged reference entries follow. These entries discuss such topics as conditions for working people, conditions for women, Fascist institutions that regulated daily life, attitudes toward race, physical culture, the arts, and more. Primary source documents give readers first-hand accounts of Fascist thought and practice. A selected bibliography directs users to additional resources. A timeline lists and describes key events related to fascism An overview essay surveys the history and significance of fascism around the world Alphabetically arranged reference entries provide information about fascist thought and daily life up to the present day Entries cite works for further reading and provide cross-references A selection of annotated primary source documents gives readers first-hand accounts of fascism in theory and practice A selected, general bibliography directs readers to the most important resources on fascism

My Zeppelins

My Zeppelins


Empires of the Sky

The Golden Age of Aviation is brought to life in this story of the giant Zeppelin airships that once roamed the sky—a story that ended with the fiery destruction of the Hindenburg. “Genius . . . a definitive tale of an incredible time ...

Empires of the Sky

The Golden Age of Aviation is brought to life in this story of the giant Zeppelin airships that once roamed the sky—a story that ended with the fiery destruction of the Hindenburg. “Genius . . . a definitive tale of an incredible time when mere mortals learned to fly.”—Keith O’Brien, The New York Times At the dawn of the twentieth century, when human flight was still considered an impossibility, Germany’s Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin vied with the Wright Brothers to build the world’s first successful flying machine. As the Wrights labored to invent the airplane, Zeppelin fathered the remarkable airship, sparking a bitter rivalry between the two types of aircraft and their innovators that would last for decades, in the quest to control one of humanity’s most inspiring achievements. And it was the airship—not the airplane—that led the way. In the glittery 1920s, the count’s brilliant protégé, Hugo Eckener, achieved undreamed-of feats of daring and skill, including the extraordinary Round-the-World voyage of the Graf Zeppelin. At a time when America’s airplanes—rickety deathtraps held together by glue, screws, and luck—could barely make it from New York to Washington, D.C., Eckener’s airships serenely traversed oceans without a single crash, fatality, or injury. What Charles Lindbergh almost died doing—crossing the Atlantic in 1927—Eckener had effortlessly accomplished three years before the Spirit of St. Louis even took off. Even as the Nazis sought to exploit Zeppelins for their own nefarious purposes, Eckener built his masterwork, the behemoth Hindenburg—a marvel of design and engineering. Determined to forge an airline empire under the new flagship, Eckener met his match in Juan Trippe, the ruthlessly ambitious king of Pan American Airways, who believed his fleet of next-generation planes would vanquish Eckener’s coming airship armada. It was a fight only one man—and one technology—could win. Countering each other’s moves on the global chessboard, each seeking to wrest the advantage from his rival, the struggle for mastery of the air was a clash not only of technologies but of business, diplomacy, politics, personalities, and the two men’s vastly different dreams of the future. Empires of the Sky is the sweeping, untold tale of the duel that transfixed the world and helped create our modern age.

Zeppelins Over England

Zeppelins Over England


Transportation

Count Zeppelin built so many dirigibles that they came to be called zeppelins in his honor . Some zeppelins were over 700 feet long and could cruise at speeds of from 70 to 100 miles per hour . A few zeppelins could carry as many as 100 ...

Transportation

Educational resource for teachers, parents and kids!

Zeppelins West

"Legends of the Old West, plus characters both real and fictional, enliven the shenanigans, commencing with Buffalo Bill Cody, a head in a jar atop a mechanical body, escorting his Wild West Show by zeppelin to Japan."--Amazon.com.

Zeppelins West

"Legends of the Old West, plus characters both real and fictional, enliven the shenanigans, commencing with Buffalo Bill Cody, a head in a jar atop a mechanical body, escorting his Wild West Show by zeppelin to Japan."--Amazon.com.

Zeppelin Nights

At the end of January a Zeppelin raid on Yorkshire and the Midlands set London nerves jangling, especially because it took place 'in bright moonlight and in broad daylight. So now there seems no protection and no respite.

Zeppelin Nights

‘Zeppelin Nights is social history at its best... White creates a vivid picture of a city changed forever by war’ The Times 2018 marks the centenary of the end of the First World War. In those four decisive years, London was irrevocably changed. Soldiers passed through the capital on their way to the front and wounded men were brought back to be treated in London’s hospitals. At night, London plunged into darkness for fear of Zeppelins that raided the city. Meanwhile, women escaped the drudgery of domestic service to work as munitionettes. Full employment put money into the pockets of the poor for the first time. Self-appointed moral guardians seize the chance to clamp down on drink, frivolous entertainment and licentious behaviour. Even against a war-torn landscape, Londoners were determined to get on with their lives, firmly resolved not to let Germans or puritans spoil their enjoyment. Peopled with patriots and pacifists, clergymen and thieves, bluestockings and prostitutes, Jerry White’s magnificent panorama reveals a battle-scarred yet dynamic, flourishing city. ‘Jerry White's name on a title page is a guarantee of a lively, compassionate book full of striking incidents and memorable images... This is a fast-paced social history that never stumbles... A well-orchestrated polyphony of voices that brings history alive’ Guardian