Mexican Gothic

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “It’s Lovecraft meets the Brontës in Latin America, and after a slow-burn start Mexican Gothic gets seriously weird.”—The Guardian IN DEVELOPMENT AS A HULU ORIGINAL LIMITED SERIES PRODUCED BY KELLY ...

Mexican Gothic

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “It’s Lovecraft meets the Brontës in Latin America, and after a slow-burn start Mexican Gothic gets seriously weird.”—The Guardian IN DEVELOPMENT AS A HULU ORIGINAL LIMITED SERIES PRODUCED BY KELLY RIPA AND MARK CONSUELOS • WINNER OF THE LOCUS AWARD • NOMINATED FOR THE BRAM STOKER AWARD ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, NPR, The Washington Post, Tordotcom, Marie Claire, Vox, Mashable, Men’s Health, Library Journal, Book Riot, LibraryReads An isolated mansion. A chillingly charismatic aristocrat. And a brave socialite drawn to expose their treacherous secrets. . . . From the author of Gods of Jade and Shadow comes “a terrifying twist on classic gothic horror” (Kirkus Reviews) set in glamorous 1950s Mexico. After receiving a frantic letter from her newly-wed cousin begging for someone to save her from a mysterious doom, Noemí Taboada heads to High Place, a distant house in the Mexican countryside. She’s not sure what she will find—her cousin’s husband, a handsome Englishman, is a stranger, and Noemí knows little about the region. Noemí is also an unlikely rescuer: She’s a glamorous debutante, and her chic gowns and perfect red lipstick are more suited for cocktail parties than amateur sleuthing. But she’s also tough and smart, with an indomitable will, and she is not afraid: Not of her cousin’s new husband, who is both menacing and alluring; not of his father, the ancient patriarch who seems to be fascinated by Noemí; and not even of the house itself, which begins to invade Noemi’s dreams with visions of blood and doom. Her only ally in this inhospitable abode is the family’s youngest son. Shy and gentle, he seems to want to help Noemí, but might also be hiding dark knowledge of his family’s past. For there are many secrets behind the walls of High Place. The family’s once colossal wealth and faded mining empire kept them from prying eyes, but as Noemí digs deeper she unearths stories of violence and madness. And Noemí, mesmerized by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, may soon find it impossible to ever leave this enigmatic house behind. “It’s as if a supernatural power compels us to turn the pages of the gripping Mexican Gothic.”—The Washington Post “Mexican Gothic is the perfect summer horror read, and marks Moreno-Garcia with her hypnotic and engaging prose as one of the genre’s most exciting talents.”—Nerdist “A period thriller as rich in suspense as it is in lush ’50s atmosphere.”—Entertainment Weekly

Doubles and Hybrids in Latin American Gothic

These issues are taken up in contemporary Mexican Gothic literature. In this chapter, I am selecting certain Mexican writers from the twentieth and twentyfirst centuries who belong to this branch in that they appropriate Gothic elements ...

Doubles and Hybrids in Latin American Gothic

Doubles and Hybrids in Latin American Gothic focuses on a recurrent motif that is fundamental in the Gothic—the double. This volume explores how this ancient notion acquires tremendous force in a region, Latin America, which is itself defined by duplicity (indigenous/European, autochthonous religions/Catholic). Despite this duplicity and at the same time because of it, this region has also generated "mestizaje," or forms resulting from racial mixing and hybridity. This collection, then, aims to contribute to the current discussion about the Gothic in Latin America by examining the doubles and hybrid forms that result from the violent yet culturally fertile process of colonization that took place in the area.

Tropical Gothic in Literature and Culture

From the ghosts of the past we move on to Gothic visions of the future. In her reading of three Mexican literary dystopias, Inés Ordiz Allonso-Collada explores how Mexico's terrifying present (ruined urban landscapes, economic crises, ...

Tropical Gothic in Literature and Culture

Tropical Gothic examines Gothic within a specific geographical area of ‘the South’ of the Americas. In so doing, we structure the book around geographical coordinates (from North to South) and move between various national traditions of the gothic (Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, etc) alongside regional manifestations of the Gothic (the US south and the Caribbean) as well as transnational movements of the Gothic within the Americas. The reflections on national traditions of the Gothic in this volume add to the critical body of literature on specific languages or particular nations, such as Scottish Gothic, American Gothic, Canadian Gothic, German Gothic, Kiwi Gothic, etc. This is significant because, while the Southern Gothic in the US has been thoroughly explored, there is a gap in the critical literature about the Gothic in the larger context of region of ‘the South’ in the Americas. This volume does not pretend to be a comprehensive examination of tropical Gothic in the Americas; rather, it pinpoints a variety of locations where this form of the Gothic emerges. In so doing, the transnational interventions of the Gothic in this book read the flows of Gothic forms across borders and geographical regions to tease out the complexities of Gothic cultural production within cultural and linguistic translations. Tropical Gothic includes, but is by no means limited to, a reflection on a region where European colonial powers fought intensively against indigenous populations and against each other for control of land and resources. In other cases, the vast populations of African slaves were transported, endowing these regions with a cultural inheritance that all the nations involved are still trying to comprehend. The volume reflects on how these histories influence the Gothic in this region.

Gulf Gothic

Mexico, the U.S. South and La Llorona's Undead Voices Dolores Flores-Silva, Keith Cartwright ... We have outlined the rise of a Mexican gothic in key moments from Sierra O'Reilly's La hija del judio (1848–51) to Marroqui's La Llorona ...

Gulf Gothic

Gulf Gothic examines haunted, secret-laden narratives that emerge from the gulfs between peoples all along the Gulf of Mexico and on both sides of the Rio Grande. The Gulf is presented as a single transnational region and as dynamic ground zero of North American (and global) cross-culturality and trauma. Responding to the long history of Mesoamerican writing, plantation systems, and racialized divides across the region, this study argues that gothic—with all its affect, undead figures, heavy weather, and hauntings—provides a powerful lens through which to awaken the kinds of gulf-traversing vision so necessary to us here and now.

Latin American Gothic in Literature and Culture

Tracing Mexican Gothic in Óscar Urrutia Lazo's Rito terminal Enrique Ajuria Ibarra Shortly after his return from a small village in the state of Oaxaca, in Southern Mexico, photographer Mateo realizes that the pictures of a traditional ...

Latin American Gothic in Literature and Culture

This book explores the Gothic mode as it appears in the literature, visual arts, and culture of different areas of Latin America. Focusing on works from authors in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andes, Brazil, and the Southern Cone, the essays in this volume illuminate the existence of native representations of the Gothic, while also exploring the presence of universal archetypes of terror and horror. Through the analysis of global and local Gothic topics and themes, they evaluate the reality of a multifaceted territory marked by a shifting colonial and postcolonial relationship with Europe and the United States. The book asks questions such as: Is there such a thing as "Latin American Gothic" in the same sense that there is an "American Gothic" and "British Gothic"? What are the main elements that particularly characterize Latin American Gothic? How does Latin American Gothic function in the context of globalization? What do these elements represent in relation to specific national literatures? What is the relationship between the Gothic and the Postcolonial? What can Gothic criticism bring to the study of Latin American cultural manifestations and, conversely, what can these offer the Gothic? The analysis performed here reflects a body of criticism that understands the Gothic as a global phenomenon with specific manifestations in particular territories while also acknowledging the effects of "Globalgothic" on a transnational and transcultural level. Thus, the volume seeks to open new spaces and areas of scholarly research and academic discussion both regionally and globally with the presentation of a solid analysis of Latin American texts and other cultural phenomena which are manifestly related to the Gothic world.

The Gothic Tradition in Supernatural

Enrique Ajuria Ibarra, a scholar of the Mexican Gothic, observes in “Ghosting the Nation: La Llorona, Popular Culture, and the Spectral Anxiety of Mexican Identity” that La Llorona “is a folk figure that has even been embraced by ...

The Gothic Tradition in Supernatural

The CW’s long-running series Supernatural follows the adventures of brothers Sam and Dean Winchester as they pursue the “family business” of hunting supernatural beings. Blending monster-of-the-week storylines with the unfolding saga of the brothers’ often troubled relationship, the show represents Gothic concerns of anxiety, the monstrous, family trauma and, of course, the supernatural. The lines between human and monster, good and evil, are blurred and individual identities and motivations resist easy categorization. This collection of new essays examines how the series both incorporates and complicates Gothic elements related to traditional tropes, storytelling, women and gender issues and monstrosity.

Gothic Afterlives

In chapter 12, “Mexican Gothic Remakes: Carlos Enrique Taboada's Films, Possessions, and Double Loops,” Enrique Ajuria Ibarra surveys the films of Mexican director Carlos Enrique Taboada, both in their original forms and in their more ...

Gothic Afterlives

Gothic Afterlives examines the intersections between contemporary Gothic horror and remakes scholarship from various disciplinary perspectives. The essays in the collection cover a wide range of transmedia examples, including literature, film, television, video games, and digital media reimaginings.

Transnational Cinematography Studies

Figueroa's meticulous manipulation of expressionist technique, developed the conventions of a Mexican cinematic Gothic, to visually expose Buñuel's recurrent themes of isolation, social displacement, exile and madness and set a ...

Transnational Cinematography Studies

This collection explores how the role of cinematography will evolve in an ever-increasing digitized industry in a transnational context. Contributors aim to bridge conversations about critical film studies and technical film practices while proposing that cinema has always been at the foreground of transnational culture.

Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Horror Cinema

First, it will offer a brief account of a selected body of gothic films made from the 1930s to the 1960s to highlight those themes and tropes that made these Mexican films different from other gothic narratives elsewhere and demonstrate ...

Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Horror Cinema

Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Horror Cinema explores the different mechanisms and strategies through which horror films attempt to reinforce or contest gender relations and issues of sexual identity in the continent. The book explores issues of machismo, marianismo, homosociality, bromance, among others through the lens of horror narratives and, especially, it offers an analysis of monstrosity and the figure of the monster as an outlet to play out socio-sexual anxieties in different societies or gender groups. The author looks at a wide rage of films from countries such as Cuba, Peru, Mexico and Argentina and draws points of commonality, as well as comparing essential differences, between the way that horror fictions – considered by many as low-brow cinema - can be effective to delve into the way that sexuality and gender operates and circulates in the popular imaginary in these regions.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

... Serbia - Attribution - Reproduction - Yugoslavia UF Attribution of Gothic mural UF Reproduction of Italian mural ... Reproduction Mural painting and decoration , Mexican Gothic - Attribution -To 1868 ( May Subd Geog ) - Italian ...

Library of Congress Subject Headings


Questing Fictions

Erotomania: Mexico's Gothic Family Romance Bodies are visible hieroglyphs. Every body is an erotic metaphor and the meaning of all these metaphors is always the same: death. Octavio Paz, "Mask and Transparency" Octavio Paz's statement ...

Questing Fictions

Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible to scholars, students, researchers, and general readers. Rich with historical and cultural value, these works are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. The books offered through Minnesota Archive Editions are produced in limited quantities according to customer demand and are available through select distribution partners.

Certain Dark Things

a pulse-pounding thriller reimagining vampire lore by the bestselling author of Mexican Gothic Silvia Moreno-Garcia. stark lighting and smoke. When I was talking about this reissue, the editor asked me what I wanted to see on the cover ...

Certain Dark Things

Welcome to Mexico City, an oasis in a sea of vampires. Domingo, a lonely garbage-collecting street kid, is just trying to survive its heavily policed streets when a jaded vampire on the run swoops into his life. Atl, the descendant of Aztec blood-drinkers, is smart and beautiful - and very dangerous. Domingo is mesmerised. Atl needs to escape the city quickly, to get far away from the rival narco-vampire clan relentlessly pursuing her. Her plan doesn't include Domingo, but little by little, she finds herself warming up to the scrappy young man and his undeniable charm. As the trail of corpses stretches behind her, local cops and crime bosses both start closing in. Vampires, humans, cops, and criminals collide in the dark streets of Mexico City. Atl and Domingo stand little chance at all of making it out alive before the city devours them all - but they are determined to try . . . The Daughter of Doctor Moreau, the new book from Silvia Moreno-Garcia, is available to pre-order now.

What Moves the Dead

... and then I happened to read the magnificent novel Mexican Gothic, by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, and thought, “Oh my God, what can I possibly do with fungi in a collapsing Gothic house that Moreno-Garcia didn't do ten times better?!

What Moves the Dead

An Instant USA Today & Indie Bestseller A Barnes & Noble Book of the Year Finalist A Goodreads Best Horror Choice Award Nominee From T. Kingfisher, the award-winning author of The Twisted Ones, comes What Moves the Dead, a gripping and atmospheric retelling of Edgar Allan Poe's classic "The Fall of the House of Usher." *A very special hardcover edition, featuring foil stamp on the casing and custom endpapers illustrated by the author.* When Alex Easton, a retired soldier, receives word that their childhood friend Madeline Usher is dying, they race to the ancestral home of the Ushers in the remote countryside of Ruritania. What they find there is a nightmare of fungal growths and possessed wildlife, surrounding a dark, pulsing lake. Madeline sleepwalks and speaks in strange voices at night, and her brother Roderick is consumed with a mysterious malady of the nerves. Aided by a redoubtable British mycologist and a baffled American doctor, Alex must unravel the secret of the House of Usher before it consumes them all. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Velvet Was the Night

“The author's previous novel, Mexican Gothic, turned the screw on the traditional ghost story; here she gleefully pries hard-boiled noir from the cold, white hands of Chandler and Hammett.” —Oprah Daily “A lush, magnificent trip into a ...

Velvet Was the Night

GOOD MORNING AMERICA BUZZ PICK • From the New York Times bestselling author of Mexican Gothic comes a simmering historical noir about a daydreaming secretary, a lonesome enforcer, and the mystery of the missing woman they’re both desperate to find. ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: The New York Times Book Review, NPR, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, New York Public Library, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, BookPage, She Reads, Library Journal • “An adrenalized, darkly romantic journey.”—The Washington Post Mexico in the 1970s is a dangerous country, even for Maite, a secretary who spends her life seeking the romance found in cheap comic books and ignoring the activists protesting around the city. When her next-door neighbor, the beautiful art student Leonora, disappears under suspicious circumstances, Maite finds herself searching for the missing woman—and journeying deeper into Leonora’s secret life of student radicals and dissidents. Mexico in the 1970s is a politically fraught land, even for Elvis, a goon with a passion for rock ’n’ roll who knows more about kidney-smashing than intrigue. When Elvis is assigned to find Leonora, he begins a blood-soaked search for the woman—and his soul. Swirling in parallel trajectories, Maite and Elvis attempt to discover the truth behind Leonora’s disappearance, encountering hitmen, government agents, and Russian spies. Because Mexico in the 1970s is a noir, where life is cheap and the price of truth is high.

Lost in the Dark

The first true Mexican horror film was 1933's La Llorona by Ramon Peron, based on the Mexican legend of the “crying woman” ghost of the title who, ... Mexican Gothic: German Robles as Count Lavud and Carmen Montejo in El Vampiro (1957).

Lost in the Dark

Two horror films were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture in 2018, and one of them—The Shape of Water—won. Since 1990, the production of horror films has risen exponentially worldwide, and in 2013, horror films earned an estimated $400 million in ticket sales. Horror has long been the most popular film genre, and more horror movies have been made than any other kind. We need them. We need to be scared, to test ourselves, laugh inappropriately, scream, and flinch. We need to get through them and come out, blinking, still in one piece. Lost in the Dark: A World History of Horror Film is a straightforward history written for the general reader and student that can serve as a comprehensive reference work. The volume provides a general introduction to the genre, serves as a guidebook to its film highlights, and celebrates its practitioners, trends, and stories. Starting with silent-era horror films and ending with 2020’s The Invisible Man, Lost in the Dark looks at decades of horror movies. Author Brad Weismann covers such topics as the roots of horror in literature and art, monster movies, B-movies, the destruction of the American censorship system, international horror, torture porn, zombies, horror comedies, horror in the new millennium, and critical reception of modern horror. A sweeping survey that doesn’t scrimp on details, Lost in the Dark is sure to satisfy both the curious and the completist.

The Literary Almanac

1/Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (2020) A re-imagining of Gothic fantasy set in the Mexican countryside in the 1950s, in which a young woman investigates claims made in a frantic letter from her cousin that her new husband is ...

The Literary Almanac

Discover over 300 seasonal book recommendations in the ultimate reading list for book lovers everywhere. ----- 'I will be giving this book to everyone I know' - Elizabeth Day 'Francesca Beauman writes about the books she loves with irresistible passion, knowledge and warmth ... This is the best kind of reading celebration' - Rachel Joyce ----- Spanning the dreary, cold days of January to the first flushes of spring and then the blazing August heat, bibliophile Francesca Beauman offers up a wealth of book recommendations. From The Count of Monte Cristo to Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan Quartet, each has been selected to chime with a particular time of year and provide a richer reading experience. Beautifully illustrated throughout, this charming guide will delight, inspire and seriously extend your 'To Be Read' list!

Jesus and the Seven Angels

Now those of us that live in southern New Mexico know it can get very hot. But I have to say, ... is their version of American Gothic they call Mexican Gothic. Sue dressed up like a Mexican woman and Manuel as a Mexican field worker.

Jesus and the Seven Angels


Themes in Latin American Cinema

4 In the 1920s several noble but doomed indigenous characters appeared on Mexican screens. ... impervious to historical authenticity” as well as representations of Indian heritage in the form of “lost paradises” and “Mexican Gothic.

Themes in Latin American Cinema

This updated and expanded edition gives critical analyses of 23 Latin American films from the last 20 years, including the addition of four films from Bolivia. Explored throughout the text are seven crucial themes: the indigenous image, sexuality, childhood, female protagonists, crime and corruption, fratricidal wars, and writers as characters. Designed for general and scholarly interest, as well as a guide for teachers of Hispanic culture or Latin American film and literature, the book provides a sweeping look at the logistical circumstances of filmmaking in the region along with the criteria involved in interpreting a Latin American film. The book also includes interviews with and brief biographies of influential filmmakers, along with film synopses, production details and credits, transcripts of selected scenes, and suggestions for discussion and analysis.

The Death of Jane Lawrence

C.A. Higgins, author of Lightless “A sublime Gothic romance with bonesaw prose and a spreading stain of cosmic horror.” Seth Dickinson, author of e ... It's like Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell meets Mexican Gothic meets Crimson Peak.

The Death of Jane Lawrence

A haunting new imagining of gothic horror set in a dark-mirror version of post-war England that is not to be read alone at night. For fans of Crimson Peak, Shirley Jackson, Mexican Gothic and Rebecca. Practical, unassuming Jane Shoringfield has done the calculations, and decided that the most secure path forward is this: a husband, in a marriage of convenience, who will allow her to remain independent and occupied with meaningful work. Her first choice, the dashing but reclusive doctor Augustine Lawrence, agrees to her proposal with only one condition: that she must never visit Lindridge Hall, his crumbling family manor outside of town. Yet on their wedding night, an accident strands her at his door in a pitch-black rainstorm, and she finds him changed. Gone is the bold, courageous surgeon, and in his place is a terrified, paranoid man―one who cannot tell reality from nightmare, and fears Jane is an apparition, come to haunt him. By morning, Augustine is himself again, but Jane knows something is deeply wrong at Lindridge Hall, and with the man she has so hastily bound her safety to.

Mexican Gothic

. . The Daughter of Doctor Moreau, the new book from Silvia Moreno-Garcia, is available to pre-order now.

Mexican Gothic

The award-winning author of Gods of Jade and Shadow (one of the 100 best fantasy novels of all time, TIME magazine) returns with a mesmerising feminist Gothic fantasy, in which a glamorous young socialite discovers the haunting secrets of a beautiful old mansion in 1950s Mexico. He is trying to poison me. You must come for me, Noemí. You have to save me. When glamorous socialite Noemí Taboada receives a frantic letter from her newlywed cousin begging to be rescued from a mysterious doom, it's clear something is desperately amiss. Catalina has always had a flair for the dramatic, but her claims that her husband is poisoning her and her visions of restless ghosts seem remarkable, even for her. Noemí's chic gowns and perfect lipstick are more suited to cocktail parties than amateur sleuthing, but she immediately heads to High Place, a remote mansion in the Mexican countryside, determined to discover what is so affecting her cousin. Tough and smart, she possesses an indomitable will, and she is not afraid: not of her cousin's new husband, who is both menacing and alluring; not of his father, the ancient patriarch who seems to be fascinated by Noemí; and not of the house itself, which begins to invade Noemi's dreams with visions of blood and doom. Her only ally in this inhospitable abode is the family's youngest son. Shy and gentle, he seems to want to help, but might also be hiding dark knowledge of his family's past. For there are many secrets behind the walls of High Place. The family's once colossal wealth and faded mining empire kept them from prying eyes, but as Noemí digs deeper she unearths stories of violence and madness. And Noemí, mesmerised by the terrifying yet seductive world of High Place, may soon find it impossible to leave this enigmatic house behind . . . The Daughter of Doctor Moreau, the new book from Silvia Moreno-Garcia, is available to pre-order now.

The Best Horror of the Year

Coincidentally, Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Del Rey) covers some of the same ground as the Trussoni novel for the first two thirds—except that it takes place in Mexico. A vain, spoiled young woman is sent to a remote ...

The Best Horror of the Year

From Ellen Datlow (“the venerable queen of horror anthologies” (New York Times) comes a new entry in the series that has brought you stories from Stephen King and Neil Gaiman comes thrilling stories, the best horror stories available. For more than four decades, Ellen Datlow has been at the center of horror. Bringing you the most frightening and terrifying stories, Datlow always has her finger on the pulse of what horror readers crave. Now, with the thirteenth volume of the series, Datlow is back again to bring you the stories that will keep you up at night. Encompassed in the pages of The Best Horror of the Year have been such illustrious writers as: Neil Gaiman, Stephen King, Stephen Graham Jones, Joyce Carol Oates, Laird Barron, Mira Grant, and many others. With each passing year, science, technology, and the march of time shine light into the craggy corners of the universe, making the fears of an earlier generation seem quaint. But this light creates its own shadows. The Best Horror of the Year chronicles these shifting shadows. It is a catalog of terror, fear, and unpleasantness as articulated by today’s most challenging and exciting writers.

Haunted Nature

... novel The Beauty (2018); and Silvia Moreno-Garcia's novel Mexican Gothic (2020)—to name just a few. Much has been written about the defining characteristics of the “weird” tradition, and a significant critical consensus has emerged.

Haunted Nature

This volume is a study of human entanglements with Nature as seen through the mode of haunting. As an interruption of the present by the past, haunting can express contemporary anxieties concerning our involvement in the transformation of natural environments and their ecosystems, and our complicity in their collapse. It can also express a much-needed sense of continuity and relationality. The complexity of the question—who and what gets to be called human with respect to the nonhuman—is reflected in these collected chapters, which, in their analysis of cinematic and literary representations of sentient Nature within the traditional gothic trope of haunting, bring together history, race, postcolonialism, and feminism with ecocriticism and media studies. Given the growing demand for narratives expressing our troubled relationship with Nature, it is imperative to analyze this contested ground. “Chapter 6” is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License via link.springer.com.

Aura by Carlos Fuentes Book Analysis

His works, which blur the boundaries between history as a discipline and literature as fiction, are an essential landmark in Latin American writing. AURA A MEXICAN GOTHIC NOVEL Genre: Gothic novel/fantastic novel Reference.

Aura by Carlos Fuentes  Book Analysis

Unlock the more straightforward side of Aura with this concise and insightful summary and analysis! This engaging summary presents an analysis of Aura by Carlos Fuentes, which blends elements of magical realism, fantasy and the Gothic novel to create a highly original and disorienting narrative. It follows a young historian called Felipe Montero, who has just been hired by the eccentric widow Consuelo Llorente to work on her late husband’s memoirs. As the narrative progresses, he slowly begins to unravel the bizarre relationship between Consuelo and her beautiful niece Aura, with consequences that he could never have imagined. Carlos Fuentes was one of the most influential Latin American writers of the 20th century, and his novels, essays and short stories, which often engage with the politics and history of his country, represent an essential landmark in Mexican literature. Find out everything you need to know about Aura in a fraction of the time! This in-depth and informative reading guide brings you: • A complete plot summary • Character studies • Key themes and symbols • Questions for further reflection Why choose BrightSummaries.com? Available in print and digital format, our publications are designed to accompany you on your reading journey. The clear and concise style makes for easy understanding, providing the perfect opportunity to improve your literary knowledge in no time. See the very best of literature in a whole new light with BrightSummaries.com!

Ecological Crisis and Cultural Representation in Latin America

... they are fundamental for taking an ecocritical approach to the midtwentieth-century Mexican gothic aesthetic. ... resource extraction, organic fuels . . . ceded to fossil fuels, and Mexico [became] an urban nation” (Boyer 3).

Ecological Crisis and Cultural Representation in Latin America

Worldwide environmental crisis has become increasingly visible over the last few decades as the full scope of anthropogenic climate change manifests itself and large-scale natural resource extraction has expanded into formerly remote areas that seemed beyond the reach of industrialization. Scientists and popular culture alike have turned to the term "Anthropocene" to capture the global scale of environmental and even geological transformations that humans have carried out over the last two centuries. The chapters in Ecological Crisis and Cultural Representation in Latin America examine the dynamics and interplay between local cultures and the expansion of global capitalism in Latin America, emphasizing the role of art in bearing witness to and generating awareness of environmental and social crises, but also its possibilities for formulating solutions. They take particular care to draw out the ways in which local environmental crises in Latin American nations are witnessed and imagined as part of a global system, focusing on the problems of time, scale, and complexity as key terms in conceiving the dimensions of crisis. At the same time, they question the notion of the Anthropocene as a species-wide "human" historical project, making visible the coloniality of natural resource extraction in Latin America and its dire effects for local people, cultures, and environments. Taking an ecocritical approach to Latin American cultural production including literature, film, performance, and digital artwork, the chapters in this volume develop a notion of ecological crisis that captures not only its documentary sense in the representation of environmental destruction (the degradation of the oikos), but also the crisis in the modern worldview (logos) that the acknowledgment of crisis provokes. In this sense, crisis is also the promise of a turning point, of the possibilities for change. Latin American representations of ecological crisis thus create the conditions for projects that decolonize environments, developing new, sustainable ways of conceiving of and relating to our world or returning to old ones.

Reception of Northrop Frye

“Same Voices, Other Tombs: Structures of Mexican Gothic.” Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature 1, no. 1 (1976), article 4. https://doi. org/10.4148/2334-4415.1032. “Departing from Northrop Frye's observation that ...

Reception of Northrop Frye

The Reception of Northrup Frye takes a thorough accounting of the presence of Frye in existing works and argues against Frye's diminishing status as an important critical voice.

Carlos Fuentes

Carlos Fuentes, La nueva novela hispanoamericana (Mexico: Joaquín Mortiz,1969), p. 9. ... Djelal Kadir, “Same Voices, Other Tombs: Structures of Mexican Gothic,” Studies in Twentieth CenturyLiterature, 1(Fall 1976): 52. 12.

Carlos Fuentes

Carlos Fuentes is a master of modern world literature. With the translation of his major works into English and other languages, his reputation has surpassed the boundaries of his native Mexico and of Hispanic literature and has become international. Now each new novel stimulates popular and scholarly reviews in periodicals from Mexico City and Buenos Aires to Paris and New York. Carlos Fuentes: A Critical View is the first full-scale examination in English of this major writer's work. The range and diversity of this critical view are remarkable and reflect similar characteristics in the creative work of Carlos Fuentes, a man of formidable intellectual energy and curiosity. The whole of Fuentes' work is encompassed by Luis Leal as he explores history and myth in the writer's narrative. Insightful new views of single works are provided by other well-known scholars, such as Roberto González Echevarría, writing on Fuentes' extraordinary Terra Nostra, and Margaret Sayers Peden, exploring Distant Relations, for which she served as authorized translator. Here too are fresh approaches to Fuentes' other novels, among them Where the Air Is Clear, Aura, and The Hydra Head, as well as an examination by John Brushwood of the writer's short fiction and a look by Merlin Forster at Fuentes the playwright. Lanin Gyurko reaches outside Fuentes' canon for his fascinating study of the influence of Orson Welles' Citizen Kane on The Death of Artemio Cruz. Manuel Durán and George Wing consider Fuentes in his role as critic of both literature and art. Carlos Fuentes: A Critical View has been prepared with the writer's many English-speaking readers in mind. Quotations are most frequently from standard, readily available English translations of Fuentes' works. A valuable chronology of the writer's life rounds off the volume.

Uncanny Youth

Childhood, the Gothic, and the Literary Americas Suzanne Manizza Roszak ... answer to the 'transgressive ... ambiguity' of 'female corporeality' in Mexican Gothic texts like Daniela Tarazona's El animal sobre la piedra (Ordiz 2020, ...

Uncanny Youth

Within the Euro-American literary tradition, Gothic stories of childhood and adolescence have often served as a tool for cultural propaganda, advancing colonialist, white supremacist and patriarchal ideologies. This book turns our attention to modern and contemporary Gothic texts by hemispheric American writers who have refigured uncanny youth in ways that invert these cultural scripts. In the hands of authors ranging from Octavio Paz and Maryse Condé to N. Scott Momaday and Carmen Maria Machado, Gothic conventions become a means of critiquing pathological structures of power in the space of the Americas. As fictional children and adolescents confront persisting colonial and neo-imperialist architectures, grapple with the everyday ramifications of white supremacist thinking, navigate rigged systems of socioeconomic power, and attempt to frustrate patterns of gendered, anti-queer violence, the uncanny and the nightmarish in their lives force readers to reckon affectively as well as intellectually with these intersecting forms of injustice.

The Distance Between Us

writing about poverty in Mexico. ... Most importantly, it gave me permission to write about my own Mexican poverty. ... Water Under My Bed, Silvia Moreno-Garcia's Mexican Gothic, and Maceo Montoya's Letters to the Poet from His Brother.

The Distance Between Us

Traces the author's experiences as an illegal child immigrant, describing her father's violent alcoholism, her efforts to obtain a higher education, and the inspiration of Latina authors.